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UK advertising spend by media type

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This chart using data from the IAB Adspend study H1 in September 2009 shows UK advertising spend by media type.  With all the hype generated about Digital or Online advertising it’s easy to forget the bigger picture.  Looking at this data it is noticeable that Internet advertising has just overtaken TV advertising in terms of market share.  This was something that was projected to happen by many pundits in 2009.  It has happened now but nevertheless this means that the advertising media mix is still predominantly an offline activity.  Over 76% of advertising spend is still happening in the less fashionable offline world. All data needs context from other data, so included in the blue box are The Sun print sales for November 2009 which round up to 3 million (2,958,502 actual).  These have fallen by 2.87% year from the previous year.  As every media buyer purchasing an ad in The Sun knows a high proportion of the sales of the newspaper are made to the same regular customers.  Theoretically, if you placed an ad in print version of The Sun and had repeated it every day throughout November, your ad would be exposed to a very much smaller audience than 3 million and seen by many of the same people nearly every day.  The cost would be high, even if a heavy discount rate was obtained.  In media buying language this would mean your ad had a small reach (audience) with very high frequency.  A frequency that is so high that this situation seldom takes place.  This is for two reasons; firstly, the cost would be prohibitive and secondly, because the very high level of frequency would be considered inefficient and a waste of money. Alternatively if you had placed a considerably cheaper ad on moneysavingexpert.com throughout November your ad would be seen by 4.5 million visitors at an average frequency of 4.5 times.  This would produce a frequency figure that is not far out of line from an ideal rate.  Not only would you be reaching an audience that would contain a lot of Sun print readers you would also be buying exposure to a high proportion of readers to see the print version of the Daily Mail as well as many  other people.  To summarise in media language; your reach would be much greater and your frequency would be more appropriate. A bigger audience at a considerably lower cost would seem to be a “no brainer.”  But advertising and marketing are both beneath the surface very conservative animals by nature.  Change is happening but at a relatively glacial pace.  In the last year Press advertising and TV advertising have been cut so as to spend more money in Internet advertising.  The recession is hastening this move to a what is a more measurable media.  At present direct response advertising in the form of Paid Search claims 62.6% of the Internet advertising spend, with Google takes the lion’s share.  Should advertisers want to increase their brand awareness using Internet advertising then more money will also go into Google’s pockets.  Their purchase of DoubleClick and their last two years of technology investment means that they will dominate this area of online advertising as well. April 2009
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UK advertising spend by

media type

This chart using data from the IAB Adspend study H1 in September 2009 shows UK advertising spend by media type.  With all the hype generated about Digital or Online advertising it’s easy to forget the bigger picture.  Looking at this data it is noticeable that Internet advertising has just overtaken TV advertising in terms of market share.  This was something that was projected to happen by many pundits in 2009.  It has happened now but nevertheless this means that the advertising media mix is still predominantly an offline activity.  Over 76% of advertising spend is still happening in the less fashionable offline world. All data needs context from other data, so included in the blue box are The Sun print sales for November 2009 which round up to 3 million (2,958,502 actual).  These have fallen by 2.87% year from the previous year.  As every media buyer purchasing an ad in The Sun knows a high proportion of the sales of the newspaper are made to the same regular customers.  Theoretically, if you placed an ad in print version of The Sun and had repeated it every day throughout November, your ad would be exposed to a very much smaller audience than 3 million and seen by many of the same people nearly every day.  The cost would be high, even if a heavy discount rate was obtained.  In media buying language this would mean your ad had a small reach (audience) with very high frequency.  A frequency that is so high that this situation seldom takes place.  This is for two reasons; firstly, the cost would be prohibitive and secondly, because the very high level of frequency would be considered inefficient and a waste of money. Alternatively if you had placed a considerably cheaper ad on moneysavingexpert.com throughout November your ad would be seen by 4.5 million visitors at an average frequency of 4.5 times.  This would produce a frequency figure that is not far out of line from an ideal rate.  Not only would you be reaching an audience that would contain a lot of Sun print readers you would also be buying exposure to a high proportion of readers to see the print version of the Daily Mail as well as many  other people.  To summarise in media language; your reach would be much greater and your frequency would be more appropriate. A bigger audience at a considerably lower cost would seem to be a “no brainer.”  But advertising and marketing are both beneath the surface very conservative animals by nature.  Change is happening but at a relatively glacial pace.  In the last year Press advertising and TV advertising have been cut so as to spend more money in Internet advertising.  The recession is hastening this move to a what is a more measurable media.  At present direct response advertising in the form of Paid Search claims 62.6% of the Internet advertising spend, with Google takes the lion’s share.  Should advertisers want to increase their brand awareness using Internet advertising then more money will also go into Google’s pockets.  Their purchase of DoubleClick and their last two years of technology investment means that they will dominate this area of online advertising as well. April 2009
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