Connecting Devices…

 % in U.K. homes

It’s not often that one comes across data that describes a complex situation succinctly, but the chart above does precisely that.  The complexity is the disruption caused by changes in technology and in the chart above it is simply shown in terms of the percentage of U.K. homes that have devices which connect to the Internet.  This data comes from Ofcom, which is the U.K.'s communications regulator responsible to Parliament.  In January they issued a report that evaluated the U.K. communications industry from the customer’s viewpoint for last year (2013).  Ofcom investigated which devices people use to connect to the Internet in their homes in the U.K.  To create the PowerPoint chart above I’ve combined the data for netbooks and laptops to make more sense.  In many ways the term “netbook” is rapidly becoming obsolete as it covers such disparate devices as small, cheap laptops and small, thin and expensive “ultrabooks,” as well as hybrid tablet devices which also have keyboards, like the Asus Transformer T100.  Ofcom measured the hard to define netbook as being used in 8% of all U.K. homes last year. It is important to observe how people connect to the Internet in the U.K. as in many ways it is the most advanced online market in the world: Internet advertising overtook TV advertising back in 2009  – a situation that will not happen in the U.S. until at least 2017 or even later.  In that same year eMarketer expects U.K mobile advertising spending to overtake any other form of advertising, again a situation that is unlikely to prevail in the U.S. for several more years.  U.K. e-commerce is well advanced – all the major U.K. supermarkets have been running online delivery services for several years, and many retail chains offer established “click and collect” services.  Again this is an area of development in which America, and much of Europe, lags well behind.  The U.K. is Google’s (the Internet’s dominant digital company) most profitable international market and so it provides detailed figures for the U.K. in its annual reports.  That extraordinarily perceptive writer, William Gibson, once famously remarked: “the future is already here, it just isn’t evenly distributed.”  In many ways the digital future is already here in the U.K. and other countries will surely follow us. Looking at the chart above, contrary to what many media pundits would have you believe, the laptop is still the main device, at 74%, used to connect to the Internet in the home.  Laptop sales may have slowed somewhat, but these devices are still dominant, which explains why Microsoft’s Windows and Office franchise is still generating cash.  It also explains why Apple’s comparatively expensive laptops still sell in large numbers.  Laptops have successfully replaced the desktop computer and have become the everyday work-horse for most domestic Web browsing sessions.  Although, over time they shrank in size, desktop computers continued to remain obtrusive and heavy adjuncts in many living rooms and bedrooms, nevertheless they have now given way to convenient, eminently portable devices connected to home Wi-Fi networks enabling them to be used in any room in the house.  And, equally important, they take up little storage space when not in use.  This has been made possible due to better manufacturing techniques that have significantly increased laptop reliability, coupled with a vicious squeeze on the profit margins of most laptop makers making them very affordable.  It explains why laptop manufacturing companies like HP and Acer have generated volume sales yet have declining profits.  Domestic desktop computers are disappearing as fast as cathode-ray televisions did in the face of competition from larger, and much thinner, flat-panel display sets. Two comparatively recent arrivals on the digital devices scene, smartphones and tablets, are showing the greatest amount of growth, although the number of laptops used is still rising.  More than half (56% to be precise) of U.K. homes now have occupants equipped with Internet-enabled smartphones, most of whom will be connecting to their Wi-Fi network when they’re at home to save carrier charges.  The increasing number of smartphones and tablets is the reason why eMarketer is forecasting that U.K. mobile advertising will exceed TV advertising, or any other form of advertising for that matter, by 2017.  I’ve written about this phenomenon in the past, the growth in smartphones and tablets is the reason behind the huge surge in Apple’s income.  It’s also why Microsoft felt it necessary to buy Nokia’s mobile phone business, Facebook saw the need to buy WhatsApp, and why Google bought Motorola.  And it’s also the cause of Microsoft’s CEO Steve Ballmer being forced into an early retirement.  Intel’s CEO met the same fate because the Wintel monopoly was brokenIntel’s strategy of creating powerful, though battery-hungry, microprocessors was found wanting as ARM processors steadily became speedier while still using miserly amounts of battery life.  Increasing quantities of digital video is being consumed on smartphones and tablets, as well as on the ubiquitous laptops.  These three devices are severely disrupting concentration on watching television as viewers continue to multi-task while ostensibly viewing programmes and not, as formerly, just during television’s commercial breaks.  Always-connected devices in the home are radically transforming people’s behaviour - and also disrupting the Internet itself. On any desk or laptop computer you almost certainly use a browser, like Internet Explorer, Firefox or Chrome, to view information provided by the World Wide Web.  When using a mobile device you are far more likely to use a particular “app” than a browser.  I’ve found this to be very much the case for myself: on my laptop I use Firefox all the time but on my Nexus 7 tablet I hardly use Firefox at all.  To track what I was doing I downloaded and installed a handy little app called the Cisco Data Meter, to measure my tablet data usage.  Throughout last month (March) I consumed over 11 gigabytes of data on my tablet of which Firefox, my choice of Android Internet browsers, used a measly 17.60 megabytes.  Everything else I did on the Internet was via an app, not a browser.  This is most noticeable in the way I consume online news – viewing newspaper websites via Firefox on a tablet is a pain, having to zoom text in and out, and to scroll left and right.  Supposedly mobile-friendly versions of newspaper websites are not that much better, and they waste my time.  Over two gigabytes of my monthly tablet data consumption was spent using Google’s Newsstand  app, which makes reading news from a variety of sources far more pleasurable and efficient.  I have the text set to my preferred larger size, and my chosen sources are set to be downloaded for offline viewing when I’m away from the networks for which I have passwords.  By setting my selected articles to be viewed as mini cards, I can see all of the headlines as well as being able to choose which to view and which to ignore, something that makes for very rapid and effectual reading.  Any article I’m interested in, either to curate for reference, or for more leisurely reading on the large screen connected to my laptop, gets emailed to myself directly from the Newsstand app with a couple of touches of the screen. Observing my own behaviour confirms the superiority of using an app over a browser when on a mobile device.  My heart tells me the Web should be open, using a browser, and not closed, using an app, yet a dedicated app is so much easier to use.  Take as an everyday example - checking what the weather is going to be like:  This task becomes a pain using a browser on a smartphone or a tablet, using an app is very much quicker.  I prefer to use a free app, created by the BBC, which is continually updated with my location data via the tablet’s built-in GPS.   The BBC Weather app is so well designed that using it becomes enjoyable as well as being highly efficient.  The big shift to accessing the WWW on smartphones and tablets whilst out and about has caused many disruptions, the greatest of which may turn out to be the fragmentation of the Web triggered by using apps, instead of a browser, to view information.  I’m sure you know the reason for this, but just in case you don’t, I’ll explain: A browser can connect you via hyperlinks to anything, anywhere across the World Wide Web, while an app is designed to perform a precise, self- contained task in order to offer you a limited service, or to provide you with specific information, without linking to anywhere else.  Like Sir Tim Berners Lee, I want the Web to be open, and not a walled garden, yet I also want it to be easy and pleasurable to use on mobile devices.  Unfortunately, for the moment these two concepts seem incompatible.  Apps have been, and are being, developed to solve the limitations of mobile devices and in doing so they’re fragmenting the open Web. April 2014
Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart:
...with analysis & insight...
Archive: Free PowerPoint download Free PowerPoint download
Click image to enlarge
Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click to return to page
2014
View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles View All 2016 Articles
Click to return to page

Connecting Devices…

 % in U.K. homes

It’s not often that one comes across data that describes a complex situation succinctly, but the chart above does precisely that.  The complexity is the disruption caused by changes in technology and in the chart above it is simply shown in terms of the percentage of U.K. homes that have devices which connect to the Internet.  This data comes from Ofcom, which is the U.K.'s communications regulator responsible to Parliament.  In January they issued a report that evaluated the U.K. communications industry from the customer’s viewpoint for last year (2013).  Ofcom investigated which devices people use to connect to the Internet in their homes in the U.K.  To create the PowerPoint chart above I’ve combined the data for netbooks and laptops to make more sense.  In many ways the term “netbook” is rapidly becoming obsolete as it covers such disparate devices as small, cheap laptops and small, thin and expensive “ultrabooks,” as well as hybrid tablet devices which also have keyboards, like the Asus Transformer T100.  Ofcom measured the hard to define netbook as being used in 8% of all U.K. homes last year. It is important to observe how people connect to the Internet in the U.K. as in many ways it is the most advanced online market in the world: Internet advertising overtook TV advertising back in 2009  – a situation that will not happen in the U.S. until at least 2017 or even later.  In that same year eMarketer expects U.K mobile advertising spending to overtake any other form of advertising, again a situation that is unlikely to prevail in the U.S. for several more years.  U.K. e-commerce is well advanced – all the major U.K. supermarkets have been running online delivery services for several years, and many retail chains offer established “click and collect” services.  Again this is an area of development in which America, and much of Europe, lags well behind.  The U.K. is Google’s (the Internet’s dominant digital company) most profitable international market and so it provides detailed figures for the U.K. in its annual reports.  That extraordinarily perceptive writer, William Gibson, once famously remarked: “the future is already here, it just isn’t evenly distributed.”  In many ways the digital future is already here in the U.K. and other countries will surely follow us. Looking at the chart above, contrary to what many media pundits would have you believe, the laptop is still the main device, at 74%, used to connect to the Internet in the home.  Laptop sales may have slowed somewhat, but these devices are still dominant, which explains why Microsoft’s Windows and Office franchise is still generating cash.  It also explains why Apple’s comparatively expensive laptops still sell in large numbers.  Laptops have successfully replaced the desktop computer and have become the everyday work-horse for most domestic Web browsing sessions.  Although, over time they shrank in size, desktop computers continued to remain obtrusive and heavy adjuncts in many living rooms and bedrooms, nevertheless they have now given way to convenient, eminently portable devices connected to home Wi-Fi networks enabling them to be used in any room in the house.  And, equally important, they take up little storage space when not in use.  This has been made possible due to better manufacturing techniques that have significantly increased laptop reliability, coupled with a vicious squeeze on the profit margins of most laptop makers making them very affordable.  It explains why laptop manufacturing companies like HP and Acer have generated volume sales yet have declining profits.  Domestic desktop computers are disappearing as fast as cathode-ray televisions did in the face of competition from larger, and much thinner, flat-panel display sets. Two comparatively recent arrivals on the digital devices scene, smartphones and tablets, are showing the greatest amount of growth, although the number of laptops used is still rising.  More than half (56% to be precise) of U.K. homes now have occupants equipped with Internet-enabled smartphones, most of whom will be connecting to their Wi-Fi network when they’re at home to save carrier charges.  The increasing number of smartphones and tablets is the reason why eMarketer is forecasting that U.K. mobile advertising will exceed TV advertising, or any other form of advertising for that matter, by 2017.  I’ve written about this phenomenon in the past, the growth in smartphones and tablets is the reason behind the huge surge in Apple’s income.  It’s also why Microsoft felt it necessary to buy Nokia’s mobile phone business, Facebook saw the need to buy WhatsApp, and why Google bought Motorola.  And it’s also the cause of Microsoft’s CEO Steve Ballmer being forced into an early retirement.  Intel’s CEO met the same fate because the Wintel monopoly was brokenIntel’s strategy of creating powerful, though battery-hungry, microprocessors was found wanting as ARM processors steadily became speedier while still using miserly amounts of battery life.  Increasing quantities of digital video is being consumed on smartphones and tablets, as well as on the ubiquitous laptops.  These three devices are severely disrupting concentration on watching television as viewers continue to multi- task while ostensibly viewing programmes and not, as formerly, just during television’s commercial breaks.  Always-connected devices in the home are radically transforming people’s behaviour - and also disrupting the Internet itself. On any desk or laptop computer you almost certainly use a browser, like Internet Explorer, Firefox or Chrome, to view information provided by the World Wide Web.  When using a mobile device you are far more likely to use a particular “app” than a browser.  I’ve found this to be very much the case for myself: on my laptop I use Firefox all the time but on my Nexus 7 tablet I hardly use Firefox at all.  To track what I was doing I downloaded and installed a handy little app called the Cisco Data Meter, to measure my tablet data usage.  Throughout last month (March) I consumed over 11 gigabytes of data on my tablet of which Firefox, my choice of Android Internet browsers, used a measly 17.60 megabytes.  Everything else I did on the Internet was via an app, not a browser.  This is most noticeable in the way I consume online news – viewing newspaper websites via Firefox on a tablet is a pain, having to zoom text in and out, and to scroll left and right.  Supposedly mobile- friendly versions of newspaper websites are not that much better, and they waste my time.  Over two gigabytes of my monthly tablet data consumption was spent using Google’s Newsstand app, which makes reading news from a variety of sources far more pleasurable and efficient.  I have the text set to my preferred larger size, and my chosen sources are set to be downloaded for offline viewing when I’m away from the networks for which I have passwords.  By setting my selected articles to be viewed as mini cards, I can see all of the headlines as well as being able to choose which to view and which to ignore, something that makes for very rapid and effectual reading.  Any article I’m interested in, either to curate for reference, or for more leisurely reading on the large screen connected to my laptop, gets emailed to myself directly from the Newsstand app with a couple of touches of the screen. Observing my own behaviour confirms the superiority of using an app over a browser when on a mobile device.  My heart tells me the Web should be open, using a browser, and not closed, using an app, yet a dedicated app is so much easier to use.  Take as an everyday example - checking what the weather is going to be like:  This task becomes a pain using a browser on a smartphone or a tablet, using an app is very much quicker.  I prefer to use a free app, created by the BBC, which is continually updated with my location data via the tablet’s built-in GPS.   The BBC Weather app is so well designed that using it becomes enjoyable as well as being highly efficient.  The big shift to accessing the WWW on smartphones and tablets whilst out and about has caused many disruptions, the greatest of which may turn out to be the fragmentation of the Web triggered by using apps, instead of a browser, to view information.  I’m sure you know the reason for this, but just in case you don’t, I’ll explain: A browser can connect you via hyperlinks to anything, anywhere across the World Wide Web, while an app is designed to perform a precise, self-contained task in order to offer you a limited service, or to provide you with specific information, without linking to anywhere else.  Like Sir Tim Berners Lee, I want the Web to be open, and not a walled garden, yet I also want it to be easy and pleasurable to use on mobile devices.  Unfortunately, for the moment these two concepts seem incompatible.  Apps have been, and are being, developed to solve the limitations of mobile devices and in doing so they’re fragmenting the open Web. April 2014
Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: Click here to download the PowerPoint chart: