UK Internet use by time of day

Looking at this dataset it confirms how important the Internet has become in the lives of the people who use it.  By 0800hrs on a typical day already nearly half (48%) of the online population are already connected and active with nearly a fifth (19%) visiting an online community.  By 0900hrs 43% are interacting with other people within a social network or using Instant Messaging.  Truly, we are social beings seeking to connect with other people. The bad news for printed newspapers is that the second main use of the Internet is to access News.  A steady 20 percent of the online population are actively viewing News throughout the day.  Interestingly there is a small peak as people check news before leaving of work at around 1600hrs. This data come from UKOM APS.  This is the UK media industry’s online measuring service that uses panel data from Nielsen.  The panel size is around 35,000 people and is weighted to give a representative selection of the UK.  After an interview each panel member installs Nielsen’s NetSight tracking software on their PC that records the time and destination of the websites visited. As with all panel data there are disadvantages but some measurement is better than nothing.  This does though emphasise that all data benefits from always be checked against other sources.  There are two main limitations with this dataset.  Firstly, it is derived from a panel that is at best a small subset of the total number of people in the UK using the Internet.  Using Nielsen’s own figures that total is 39 million.  So the sample although expensive to acquire is still only 0.09% of the total size.  The second limitation is that it only measures personal computer activity some there is a level of richness capable of yielding insight that is lost.  For example, using GSMA (2009) data that tracked approximately half of all UK mobile online connections we know that mobile Internet access peaks between 0700hrs to 1000hrs primarily as people access Facebook on their way to work. Another surprise from this data is how important the Internet is during the day and how quickly activity falls off in the evening (to be replaced by TV).  This could be a limitation of the data collection method, i.e. personal computer only and not mobiles and or the small sample of work computers with the Nielsen NetView software installed. These limitations notwithstanding the data from UKOM APS confirm the importance of social network communities in relation to any other Internet activity and provide serious thought for the printed newspaper industry.  That online news habit is already an established pattern and getting people to pay for what has up to now been free may well prove impossible. April 2010
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2010

UK Internet use by time

of day

Looking at this dataset it confirms how important the Internet has become in the lives of the people who use it.  By 0800hrs on a typical day already nearly half (48%) of the online population are already connected and active with nearly a fifth (19%) visiting an online community.  By 0900hrs 43% are interacting with other people within a social network or using Instant Messaging.  Truly, we are social beings seeking to connect with other people. The bad news for printed newspapers is that the second main use of the Internet is to access News.  A steady 20 percent of the online population are actively viewing News throughout the day.  Interestingly there is a small peak as people check news before leaving of work at around 1600hrs. This data come from UKOM APS.  This is the UK media industry’s online measuring service that uses panel data from Nielsen.  The panel size is around 35,000 people and is weighted to give a representative selection of the UK.  After an interview each panel member installs Nielsen’s NetSight tracking software on their PC that records the time and destination of the websites visited. As with all panel data there are disadvantages but some measurement is better than nothing.  This does though emphasise that all data benefits from always be checked against other sources.  There are two main limitations with this dataset.  Firstly, it is derived from a panel that is at best a small subset of the total number of people in the UK using the Internet.  Using Nielsen’s own figures that total is 39 million.  So the sample although expensive to acquire is still only 0.09% of the total size.  The second limitation is that it only measures personal computer activity some there is a level of richness capable of yielding insight that is lost.  For example, using GSMA (2009) data that tracked approximately half of all UK mobile online connections we know that mobile Internet access peaks between 0700hrs to 1000hrs primarily as people access Facebook on their way to work. Another surprise from this data is how important the Internet is during the day and how quickly activity falls off in the evening (to be replaced by TV).  This could be a limitation of the data collection method, i.e. personal computer only and not mobiles and or the small sample of work computers with the Nielsen NetView software installed. These limitations notwithstanding the data from UKOM APS confirm the importance of social network communities in relation to any other Internet activity and provide serious thought for the printed newspaper industry.  That online news habit is already an established pattern and getting people to pay for what has up to now been free may well prove impossible. April 2010
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